Day -2: Ahead of delving into the lived experiences of Artisans

Boyhood of Raleigh, source: http://bit.ly/1WFznz6

Boyhood of Raleigh, source: http://bit.ly/1WFznz6

Michael Toolan says that every narrative has three elements: the teller, a tale, and an addressee. Look at the power of the tale above: the arm of the teller is fully stretched towards the sea, but the boys are intent as their gaze is fixed on the teller. What is he telling?

Generation to generation

Generation to generation

Grandma

Grandma

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perhaps it is not that difficult at times.

However, that doesn’t make¬†all things told, narratives. For example, a running commentary on a game that you are watching in a stadium, is not a story.

Hawthorn (1985) says that a story is a sequence of events, directly mediated by telling. We stare at and through it. While our eyes are fixed at the telling, our minds are at that which is being told.

About ...

About …

Narrative is different from conversation, and hence in a way describes the narrator. Though there are narratives that are stand-alone. You can take them or leave them. They are not necesarily linked to their authors or the contexts.

Tete e tete

Tete e tete

Further, there are three crucial element of a narrative.

  1. Fabrication: Not as spontaneously as a conversation. Some thought and effort goes into planning, arranging, and choosing.
And then Buddha said...

And then Buddha said…

2.¬†Trajectory: Narratives are expected to, and usually they do, ‘go’ somewhere with some development, towards some conclusion and resolution.

Lines1

Lines1

3. Prefabrication: All narratives may be unique. But they also have some bits common with many others.

Fingers

Fingers

… and so, here I am, getting packed and ready to leave to meet my narratives and the narrators thereof!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s